Science

UWindsor biologist Barbara Zielinski and team. From left to right: Front row: Gillian Hughes, Dr. Barbara Zielinski, Jenna Jones, Kaela Scott, Dr. Michelle Nevett.  Back row: Tina Suntres, Georgette Nader, Gianfranco Grande, Alexandra Zygowska, Karl BoyesUWindsor biologist Barbara Zielinski and team. From left to right: Front row: Gillian Hughes, Dr. Barbara Zielinski, Jenna Jones, Kaela Scott, Dr. Michelle Nevett. Back row: Tina Suntres, Georgette Nader, Gianfranco Grande, Alexandra Zygowska, Karl Boyes.

Working to eradicate invasive species

A UWindsor biologist and students use pheromone research to outsmart the invasive sea lampre, an eel-like fish in the Great Lakes.

Daniel Heath, an integrated biologist at UWindsor's Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, is heading a project to ensure the sustainability of freshwater fish stocks for generations to come.Daniel Heath, an integrated biologist at UWindsor's Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, is heading a project to ensure the sustainability of freshwater fish stocks for generations to come.

Freshwater fish research receives $9.1 million in funding

A UWindsor research project that will help ensure the sustainability of freshwater fish stocks in Canada for generations to come has received $9.1 million in funding.

Daniel Heath, an integrated biology professor at UWindsor’s Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, is heading a genome project that involves Canadian researchers from coast to coast.

Brianna Lunardi taking samples of the sand and vegetation in Stanhope on the island’s north shore.Grad student Brianna Lunardi, a member of the Coastal Research Group, is in Prince Edward Island studying sand dunes and beaches. Here, she is shown taking samples of the sand and vegetation in Stanhope on the island’s north shore.

Coastal research takes group to Prince Edward Island beaches

Members of the Coastal Research Group are flying drones over the Prince Edward Island shore to map beaches, dunes, and rip currents.

Dr. Kenneth Drouillard, professor at the University of Windsor's Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, explains why the emergence of mayflies can be an indication of lake health.Dr. Kenneth Drouillard, professor at the University of Windsor's Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, explains why the emergence of mayflies can be an indication of lake health.

UWindsor prof clears the air on mayflies

Most years, they rise from the water and blanket unsuspecting communities.

Children scream as their friends run in pursuit with one of these winged-insects pinched tight between their fingers.

But what are they exactly and should we be encouraged when some years produce seemingly record levels and others don’t?

Are they fishflies, June bugs, or mayflies?